Heard

Working to Advance Health Equity in Africa

Research project

Whole systems assessment and response

Overview:

HEARD, in collaboration with researchers from the University of East London (UK), have undertaken a study that assesses how the scale-up of antiretroviral treatment programmes affect health workers from the perspective of work motivation, with a view to suggesting practical strategies for improving work conditions.
The focus of the study in South Africa is on public ART programmes, specifically on three key areas: health financing and expenditure, service provision and utilisation, and human resources. Contrary to expectations, the study shows that the work environment of ART personnel is comparatively favourable, with higher job satisfaction, lighter workloads, better staffing levels and lower sickness absence than claimed by non-ART personnel.

Objectives:

The aim of the study in South Africa is to investigate the impacts of anti-retroviral (ART) scale-up on the health system focusing specifically on three key areas: health financing and expenditure, service provision and utilisation, and human resources for health.

Methodological approach:

A self-reported questionnaire on working conditions is administered to a randomly selected sample of nurses and doctors, including individuals who work with HIV positive patients and those who do not, at hospitals and clinics within the Ilembe district in KwaZulu-Natal and the Winelands region in the Western Cape. Selected quantitative research tools are used to compare differences.

Key outputs

Journal article

George, G., Atujuna, M., Gentile, J., Quinlan, T., Schmidt, P., Tobi, P., and Renton, A. 2010, The impact of ART scale-up on health workers: Evidence from two South African districts AIDS Care, 77 (84), - , Taylor & Francis Online, DOI: 10.1080/09540120903544439